state of the art skiing technologies

slide, glide or carve? usually, there’s only one option at a time. kneissl built a new ski which is suitable both for gliding and carving: the powerglide ski (pdf) :) it’s based on a ‘classic’ sandwich construction, but might be worth trying.

recently, i had the opportunity to test atomic‘s top-of-the-line race-carving ski, the gs:11. it’s a nice, fast and warp resistant ski, but mainly fun for racing (radius: 19 m) and less suitable for free carving. on the other hand, allround carving skis are usually too soft and slow. that’s where the kneissl powerglide skis comes into play :) if they just had more dealers, i’d like to test such a kneissl next! if i can’t test-drive the kneissls i’ll probably go for a good cap construction ski (my favorites here: elan and salomon)

btw: regarding ski boots, i’m not happy with the currently offered models. i tried several of them, but i still prefer my very aged nordica 857 boots which combine a convenient rear entry with good instep flexibility and yet fit tightly. all the major boot manufacturers however only seem to sell these silly front entry boots nowadays – which is a pity as these boots are very inflexible at the instep. i wonder how long it will take for a comeback of the good old rear entry ski boots! i hope mines won’t go bust till then ;)

7 Replies to “state of the art skiing technologies”

  1. You have mentioned your nordica 857 skiboots. My wife has got the same. Unfortunately the left back heel of her shoe broke away last week and I can#t find any spare parts in our local shops. Do you have good advice where to find them?

  2. I would suggest to ask Nordica: http://www.nordica.com/dynamic/contact.php?siteVersion=17&idL=4&restart=1&

    I wouldn’t expect though that they still have spare parts for this model (due to its age). Further, considering that a part of plastic broke away already I would be very cautious about still using these boots as it is likely an indication that the boot’s plastic isn’t flexible enough anymore for a safe operation.
    I’d thus suggest to buy new, current boots, even if the 857 fit perfectly.

    Good luck!

  3. Since the 857 appear to have removable Heel and Toe Lugs, I’ll presume that is the part that Gerhard speaks of. I too suffer from shattered 857 soles and would love to locate replacements. I’ve used the contact form on the Nordica website, but am not holding my breath for a positive reply requesting parts for boots that are probably 15 or more years old. :-(

  4. Thank u John, you save me the day. My 857’s got the rear sole volatised and I was very sad till I saw your post.

    I have had these boots for more than 20 years now and I don’t wanna change them, I agree completely with Flightgear: these boots are superior in flexibility, comodity and in facility to wear and take them out. I cannot understand why Nordica do not make boots with multifunction system anymore.

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